Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, Biography, wiki

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, Biography, wiki

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, popularly known as Mahatma Gandhi, was a prominent political leader of the Indian independence movement.These principles of his inspired people all over the world for the civil rights and freedom movement. He is also called the Father of the Nation. Subhash Chandra Bose had addressed him as 'Father of the Nation' in the broadcast released in the name of Gandhiji in the year 1944 from Rangoon Radio.
Mahatma Gandhi is a mishra for the entire human race. He followed non-violence and truth in every situation and asked people to follow them. He lived his life in virtue. He always wore traditional Indian dress dhoti and cotton shawl. This great man, who always eats vegetarian food, also kept long fasts for self-purification.
Before returning to India in 1915, Gandhi fought for the civil rights of the people of the Indian community in South Africa as a migrant lawyer. Coming to India, he toured the entire country and united the farmers, laborers and laborers to fight against heavy land tax and discrimination.
In 1921, he took over the reins of the Indian National Congress and through his actions influenced the political, social and economic landscape of the country. He gained considerable fame with the Salt Satyagraha in 1930 and the 'Quit India' movement in 1942. During the independence struggle of India, Gandhi ji also remained in jail for many years on many occasions.
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was born on 2 October 1869 in Porbandar, a coastal city in Gujarat, India. His father Karamchand Gandhi was a Diwan of a small princely state (Porbandar) of Kathiawar during the British Raj. Mohandas's mother Putlibai Parnami belonged to the Vaishya community and was highly religious in nature, influenced by young Mohandas and these values ​​later played an important role in her life.

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